Saturday, November 8, 2008

L'air du Desert Morocain

Okay, on this one I have to skip the traditional approaches, either in my own or more traditional perfume writing.

I smell L'Air du Desert Morocain and I smell my grandfather's hands. I remember the look, smell, and atmosphere of the corner of their family room by the fireplace which had the door to the garage/basement stairs, and I smell his woodshop. I am in a whirl of memories, and yet laser focused all at once. This perfume doesn't smell like my grandfather, or remind me of him; this smell puts me back there, in that house, smelling those hands which smelled like the freshly cut wood from his band saw, like something from his basement was left inside the cedar chest he made me, like I am inside that house that he built and I've been left alone and I am having another one of those "I'll never forget this particular moment" experiences.

I know Andy Tauer imagined himself in a Moroccan desert. I'm in a house in the woods nearly on top of the 45th parallel; there was a fire in the fireplace last night, fresh wood on the hearth ready to burn, the knotty pine panelling on the walls is 1/2" thick, my grandfather's "coveralls" are hanging on a hook in the hallway waiting for spring and the garden, and I'm waiting for the grown-ups to call me to dinner.

It's not the trip Andy intended, but I'm incredibly grateful to be given it.

6 comments:

Jenavira13 said...

What a wonderful memory. I pretty positive Andy wouldn't mind; he seems to be a wonderfully sweet fellow. I admit I have a somewhat similar experience with DK's Black Cashmere, many people consider it dark and spicy, but for me it is the perfect resinous scent which reminds me of my parents wood carving shop located in the garage.

The Daily Connoisseur said...

Beautifully written... I love it when I am able to use one (or all) of my five senses to bring me back to a magical place. I am assuming your grandfather is not still around so how delightful that you got to visit him in this way...

ScentScelf said...

Jenavira,
Funny you mention Black Cashmere; I like it quite a bit, and didn't find it one of those "have to get used to it" scents. Wonder if the wood shop associations come into play there, as well; clearly, they are not as to the fore as they are with L'Air.

I have found Andy to be incredibly pleasant and funny in blog dialogues with him--you're probably right that he wouldn't mind my personal peccadillo. :)

ScentScelf said...

Daily,

My grandfather has been gone for a number of years now, and you are right, to be able to conjure happy associations like this is a happy thing. Thanks for the nice words.

Perfumeshrine said...

Love this post of yours (one can feel the sentiment) and love L'air du desert marocain. It's Andy's masterpiece (and he has produced many wonderful scents, so it says a lot).

ScentScelf said...

I've smelled very little of Andy's ouevre...for a long time, I only had experience with Reverie au Jardin. (However, I was absolutely enthralled, and snapped up a partial bottle when the opportunity came around.)

Vetiver Dance came recently, of course (smiles thankfully in your direction), and I admire that one. With L'Air, I'm getting the picture why Andy has such a rabid following...he really seems to get how to work with particular ingredients, and let them help determine where to go with his imaginings. It's a very respectful, creative, and understanding trick.